“In today’s world, it’s not enough just to be a scientist, you have to be a science educator.” Samantha Joye, University of Georgia

We watched this short video on how scientists responded to the Deep Horizon disaster; it’s the five year anniversary and we were wondering about the current status of the site and its impact. The video didn’t give us any updates on today’s context, but it did a nice job of talking about disaster science. Great job highlighting the dynamics of time and space in science — how quickly things need to mobilize in the moment of disaster, how crisis driven science gets challenged, and that five-years is a really short period of time in science.

NASA's Terra Satellites Sees Spill on May 24 Sunlight illuminated the lingering oil slick off the Mississippi Delta on May 24, 2010.
NASA’s Terra Satellites Sees Spill on May 24 Sunlight illuminated the lingering oil slick off the Mississippi Delta on May 24, 2010.

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